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  • "I really loved Pandora Gets Jealous because it was funny. At 250 pages long, it took me a while to read it, but I enjoyed it anyway. I think the story will make children think before they disobey their parents or others people's rules, which is the moral of this story. Carolyn Hennesy is the type of author I like. She writes long books, but makes it funny so kids aren't bored by how long it is. There is a glossary in the back which helps with all of the names and words children may not know. I think that children and adults would both like this book. This would make a great gift." - S. Spangler, age 9, Storknet.com

  • "fast-moving, page-turning" -- curledup.com

  • “Light without being trite, this witty introduction to Olympus and the Greek gods will keep modern goddesses ages 9 to 12 hooked.” —St. Louis Post Dispatch

  • "Written in a sassy, witty and conversational tone, Pandora Gets Jealous is an adventure-quest story about giving in to peer pressure, the true meaning of friendship and taking responsibility for one’s actions." —kidsread.com

  • “Completely hooks you in and doesn't let you go until the end, a must-read for Greek mythology lovers." —bookdivas.com

  • Kicking off with Pandora Gets Jealous, Hennesy's Pandora series is a fun mix of history, mythology, and tween angst, told with good humor and light adventure. It's a delightful read, deserving of attention —The Trades (Online)

  • “This debut joins recent titles, such as Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief and Clea Hantman’s Heaven Sent, that spin classical Greek mythology into irreverent adventure stories. Pandora, or Pandy, knows she is taking a great risk when she brings her father’s special box to school for a show-and tell project. Given to him by Zeus, the box contains seven kinds of misery and evil capable of destroying civilization, but Pandy’s desire to impress her snotty classmates and imperious teachers overrides caution. So begins this retelling of the Pandora myth, in which Pandy is given a chance to repair the damage she has caused by setting out on a quest, arranged by the gods and goddesses, to recapture the box’s unleashed contents. The story includes many elements straight from a contemporary kids’ world, including some archetypal mean girls, and a glossary will help readers keep track of the Mount Olympus cast. The first title in the Mythic Misadventures series, this imaginative novel will capture fans of light, action-filled, girl-powered adventures.” —Booklist

  • "In the first episode in a chick-lit hero-tale series dubbed “Mythic Misadventures,” 13-year-old Pandora Atheneus Andromaeche Helena—Pandy, for short—“borrows” the fateful box from her father Prometheus for a school project, then is charged by Zeus to recapture the seven escaped evils—or else. Assisted (ably or otherwise) by her trusty dog Dido, two friends (one with, literally, two left feet) and several sympathetic Greek gods, she starts off by going after Jealousy, which has taken up residence in nearby Delphi. Flavoring her ancient-world setting with such modern tropes as school cliques, incipient zits and parenting issues, Hennesy also populates it with a mix of mortals, immortals, demigods and monsters at least loosely based on those from myth (an annotated cast list is appended). The result is a tale that starts out light but takes on more serious notes as Pandy sees the widespread catastrophe she’s caused and courageously shoulders the responsibility for making things right again. Deed done at last, Pandy and sidekicks head off to Alexandria to tackle Vanity. It won’t be hard to sell this to Rick Riordan fans, though it reads a little younger. "—Kirkus Reviews

  • “Harry Potter meets Edith Hamilton in this cheeky rendition of Pandora's famous faux pas, first in the Mythic Adventures series. Prometheus's daughter, Pandora, sneaks the notorious box of evils out of hiding rather than bring her father's boring old eagle-eaten liver to a student competition at the Athena Maiden Middle School, where she accidentally opens it and releases the plagues of humanity. Sentenced by Zeus to retrieve them, Pandora is aided by secret gifts from some gods and goddesses who, as Hermes tells her, remember their own youthful mistakes: “A little petty thievery, a few unrequited loves, people mistakenly transformed into animals or trees or hideous monsters. Things we're not proud of, all right?” Pandy, accompanied by two stricken friends, finds her way to the Oracle at Delphi and gets Jealousy back. Aspiring Hellenists will appreciate Hennesy's informed liberties with her topic, and novices will be not only fine but possibly inspired to go further. Debut novelist Hennesy's Hollywood comedian background shows in her witty juxtapositions of modern popular culture and classical Greek legend: her work is rife with mythic creatures (dryads, satyrs, gorgons), magic (a talking diary, winged flying shoes, shape-shifting) and lively dialogue (“ 'Hey, sorry about the light,' Hermes said. 'Standard procedure. Zeus wants everyone to be terribly afraid when I appear whether it's good news or bad; but that kind of thinking is sooooo Bronze Age, right?' ”). Accurate where it counts, this loosely interpreted myth rarely misses a comic twist.”—PW, starred review

  • "Hennesy ably creates tension through unpredictable pacing, the inclusion of unexpected villains, and the satisfyingly over-the-top interventions of the gods. In an increasingly rich field of mythology-based fiction for upper elementary and middle school students, Pandora's attempts to save herself, her family, and the world represent a worthy addition." —BCCB

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